How To

Make Your Linux Desktop Look Like a Mac

Want the look and feel of a Mac without paying the high-end design premium? Tired of hearing from all your Mac-happy friends how awesome Leopard looks? Got time to run through six pages of instructions? This How To has got you covered.

How To Set Up VMware Tools On Various Linux Distributions

This document explains how to set up the VMware Tools in the following guest operating systems: Ubuntu 7.04, Fedora 7, PCLinuxOS 2007 and Debian Etch.

The real Fix For Comcast BitTorrent Throttling

First, a little explanation may be needed as to what is happening in between you, Comcast and the Internet. Basically Comcast has been using a packet filtering platform called Sandvine. Sandvine is a essentially a Quality of Service device that actually has legitimate uses, such as giving high priority to Xbox Live communications and VOIP.

Beating Sandvine with Linux iptables

"If you are tired of Sandvine screwing with your BitTorrent and a user of GNU/Linux, then this is for you. I will tell you how to take your bandwidth back."

Using a Bluetooth remote to control Amarok 1.4

A member of the Amarok development team posted some instructions explaining how certain Bluetooth devices can be made to control Amarok 1.4. this is only just the beginning as the LinuxMCE project is working with the KDE folks to bring their technologies right into KDE for post KDE 4.0 releases, which means support out of the box.

Set up a Web server cluster in 5 easy steps

Construct a highly available Apache Web server cluster that spans multiple physical or virtual Linux servers in 5 easy steps with Linux Virtual Server and Heartbeat v2.

How To Live an Open-Source Musical Life With Ogg Vorbis

In an effort to rally support for the underdog media format, the Free Software Foundation has launched PlayOgg.org, a website promoting awareness of the Ogg format. It's an educational primer for playing Ogg Vorbis audio files and Ogg Theora video files on Mac and Windows desktops.

How to flash motherboard BIOS from Linux (no DOS/Windows, no floppy drive)

You've finally made the move to a Windows-free computer, you're enjoying your brand new Linux OS, no trojans/viruses, no slowdown, everything's perfect. Suddenly, you need to update the BIOS on your motherboard to support some new piece of hardware, but typically the motherboard vendor is offering only DOS based BIOS flash utilities. You panic! Fortunately, this problem is easy to solve...